Cochineal

This is the story of a color—one that began as an evolutionary tale, and evolved to shape the course of human history. Cochineal, a tiny, cactus-dwelling insect that produces a vibrant red pigment, was harvested for thousands of years by Indigenous peoples to produce a dye for their own textiles. Following the Spanish invasion of the Americas, cochineal ultimately became a globally traded commodity. In Europe, its red became the color of power, tinting the red coats of English soldiers and the Catholic clergy’s capes. Its commerce transformed the world of textiles, art and trade, but at the expense of the Indigenous knowledge systems and labor that brought it to bear in the first place. This is a story of how a color changed the world, and how the world exploited a resource.

Illustration of a man harvesting cochineal from a cactus.

Cochineal Harvest
This image, titled “Indian Collecting Cochineal with a Deer Tail” is from Memoria sobre la naturaleza, cultivo, y beneficio de la grana, a 1777 essay written by scientist and scholar José Antonio de Alzate y Ramírez detailing cochineal production.

Cochineal, Dactylopius coccus, is a small scale insect native to subtropical South America through the Southwest United States that lives in stationary clumps on nopal, prickly pear cacti of the genus Opuntia. The word cochineal is derived from the Latin word “coccinus” meaning “scarlet-colored," a reference to carminic acid, a red-hued chemical produced by female cochineals and their eggs which is used to make a vibrant red dye. Indigenous people in Puebla, Tlaxcala and Oaxaca devised complex systems to cultivate and harvest both the insect and its host cactus to produce the pigment for dyeing fiber, a process that required an in-depth knowledge of the natural history of both the insect and cactus.
  • Cochineal insects on a cactus pad
    Cochineal, Dactylopius coccus
    Cochineal insects are tiny, soft-bodied, flat, oval-shaped scale insects. Wingless females like these cluster together on cactus pads, penetrating the cacti’s flesh to feed on its juices using beak-like mouthparts.

    Photo by Vahe Martirosyan, CC BY 2.0

  • A glass model of a prickly pear cactus.

    Prickly Pear Cactus, Opuntia phaecantha
    Cochineal insects feed on virtually any of the more than 200 species of prickly pear cacti. This glass model, made by glass artist Rudolf and Leopold Blaschka, depicts one such species, Opuntia phaeacantha.

    The Ware Collection of Blaschka Glass Models of Plants, Harvard University Herbaria © President and Fellows of Harvard College

  • Cactus pads infected by hanging small baskets called Zapotec nests.
    Nopalries
    Cochineal and their host cacti are cultivated together on farms called nopalries. Cactus pads are infected by hanging small baskets called Zapotec nests from them, seen here, which contain fertile females.

    Photo by Oscar Carrizosa, CC BY-SA 3.0

  • A white, waxy substance on a catus leaf.

    Infection
    Flightless females mate with winged males and give birth to tiny nymphs that secrete a white, waxy substance over their bodies to protect from excessive sun and water loss.

    Photo by Katja Schulz, CC BY 2.0

  • Carmine Acid
    Females and their eggs produce a red chemical, carminic acid, to deter insect predators. This is the key ingredient for producing the highly coveted vibrant red dye.

    Photo by gailhampshire, CC BY 2.0

  • Female cochineal and their eggs on a cactus pad.

    Ripe for Harvest
    Cochineal are harvested from nopal pads after about 90 days. This is a labor-intensive process where farmers individually knock, brush or pick females and their eggs from the cacti, collecting them by the thousands.

    Photo by Zyance, CC BY-SA 2.5

  • Boiled and sun-dried cochineal.

    Dried Cochineal
    Cochineal are killed by boiling them in water, and then sun-dried to about 30% of their body weight.

    Photo by یردیح ایور, CC BY-SA 3.0

  • Woman grinding dried cochineal into a fine, red powder.

    Grinding to a Powder
    The dried insects are ground to a fine red powder, which is collected for further processing. It takes about 70,000 insects to make one kilogram of dye.

    Photo by Thelmadatter, CC BY-SA 4.0

  • A glass bottle of carmine.
    Making the Dye
    Carmine, the primary ingredient in red dye, is extracted by boiling the powdered insect bodies in water. Different chemicals are added to the solution, depending on the shade of red desired.

    Photo by H. Zell, CC BY-SA 3.0

Cochineal is one of the oldest pigments used in the Americas, dating back to as early as the second century BC. Its red was symbolic of the gods, sun and blood, and employed in rituals of the Maya and Aztec peoples who traded it throughout Central and South America. Indigenous people in the Mexican regions of Puebla, Tlaxcala and Oaxaca had systems for breeding and engineering cochineal insects for ideal traits to produce red paint pigments for coloring manuscripts and murals, and to dye cloth and feathers. Following the Spanish invasion, it was traded around the world, and its production became an industry that relied entirely on the expertise and labor of Indigenous Mexicans, though they were never acknowledged for it.

Spain’s conquest of much of the New World in the 16th century introduced cochineal dyes to Europe which quickly sparked global demand. It was brighter and more saturated than any other red dye in the Old World, roughly ten times more potent than the next best option. Explosive demand led to rapid growth in production, which was done almost exclusively in Oaxaca by Indigenous producers. It became Mexico’s second-most valued export after silver, and by the 17th century, it was traded as far away as India. Cochineal red became an international symbol of power in Europe and beyond, and access to it was controlled exclusively by the Spanish who kept the true source of the pigment a carefully guarded secret until the 18th century when European biologists finally deciphered its source to be an insect. Farms began cropping up elsewhere which effectively ended the Mexican monopoly. By the 19th century, cochineal was largely replaced by synthetic dyes, though it is still used today in many foods, beverages, clothing, and cosmetics.

A group of historical reenactors in red coats and black top hats in marching formation.
Redcoats
Pigments produced from the cochineal insect gave the English “Redcoats” their distinctive uniforms.

WyrdLight, CC BY-SA 3.0

Faded red and gold clergy robe.

The Clergy
Cochineal red became a symbol of authority in the Catholic Church, which dressed its cardinals in scarlet robes like this one.

VAwebteam, CC BY-SA 3.0

  • The Bedroom (1888) by Vincent Van Gogh, France

    The Bedroom (1888) by Vincent Van Gogh, France
    © Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam (Vincent van Gogh Foundation)

  • Four young boys, one playing the lyte, another reading a book.

    The Musicians (1595) by Caravaggio, Italy
    Yair Haklai, CC BY-SA 3.0

  • Painting of a devil tempting a woman, Saint Rose.

     Saint Rose Tempted by the Devil (1695-1697) by Cristobal de Villalpando, Spain  

  • The Incredulity of Saint Thomas (1601–1602) by Caravaggio, Italy

    The Incredulity of Saint Thomas (1601–1602) by Caravaggio, Italy

  •  Portrait of Isabella Brant (1625–1626) by Peter Paul Rubens, Italy

  • Saint Jerome as Scholar (1610) by El Greco, Spain

  • Portrait of Agostino Pallavicini (1621) by Anthony van Dyck, Netherlands

     Portrait of Agostino Pallavicini (1621) by Anthony van Dyck, Netherlands 

Esta es la historia de un color que comenzó como un cuento evolutivo y evolucionó para dar forma al curso de la historia humana. La cochinilla, un diminuto insecto que habita en los cactus y que produce un pigmento rojo intenso, fue cosechado durante miles de años por los indígenas para producir un tinte para sus propios tejidos. Tras la invasión española de las Américas, la cochinilla acabó convirtiéndose en un producto comercializado en todo el mundo. En Europa, su rojo se convirtió en el color del poder, tiñendo los abrigos rojos de los soldados ingleses y las capas del clero católico. Su comercio transformó el mundo de los textiles, el arte y el comercio, pero a costa de los sistemas de conocimiento y la mano de obra indígenas que lo hicieron posible. Esta es la historia de cómo un color cambió el mundo, y de cómo el mundo explotó un recurso.

Illustration of a man harvesting cochineal from a cactus.

Cosecha de cochinilla

Esta imagen, titulada "Indio Cosechando Cochinilla con una Cola de Ciervo" procede de Memoria sobre la naturaleza, cultivo, y beneficio de la grana, un ensayo de 1777 escrito por el científico y erudito José Antonio de Alzate y Ramírez que detalla la producción de la cochinilla.

La cochinilla, Dactylopius coccus, es un pequeño insecto nativo de América del Sur subtropical hasta el suroeste de los Estados Unidos que vive en grupos estacionarios en los nopales, cactus espinosos del género Opuntia. La palabra cochinilla deriva del latín "coccinus" que significa "de color escarlata", una referencia al ácido carmínico, una sustancia química de color rojo producida por las cochinillas hembras y sus huevos, que se utiliza para hacer un tinte de color rojo intenso. Los indígenas de Puebla, Tlaxcala y Oaxaca idearon complejos sistemas para cultivar y cosechar tanto el insecto como el cactus que lo hospeda, con el fin de producir el pigmento para teñir fibras, un proceso que requería un profundo conocimiento de la historia natural tanto del insecto como del cactus.
  • Close up of two red bugs (cochineals) on a cactus leaf.

    Cochinilla, Dactylopius coccus
    Los insectos cochinilla son pequeñas cochinillas de cuerpo blando, planas y ovaladas. Las hembras sin alas se agrupan en las almohadillas de los cactus y penetran su carne para alimentarse de sus jugos mediante unas piezas bucales en forma de pico.
     
    Foto de Vahe Martirosyan, CC BY 2.0

     

  • A glass model of a prickly pear cactus.

    Tulipán Nopal, Opuntia phaecantha
    Los insectos cochinillas se alimentan de prácticamente cualquiera de las más de 200 especies de nopales. Este modelo de vidrio, realizado por el artista del vidrio Rudolf y Leopold Blaschka, representa una de estas especies, la Opuntia phaeacantha.

    Colección Ware de Modelos de Vidrio de Plantas de Blaschka, Herbario de la Universidad de Harvard © President and Fellows of Harvard College

  • Cactus pads infected by hanging small baskets called Zapotec nests.

    Nopaleras
    La cochinilla y los cactus que las hospedan se cultivan juntos en granjas llamadas nopaleras. Los nopales se infectan colgando de ellos unas pequeñas cestas llamadas nidos zapotecas, vistas aquí, y que contienen hembras fértiles.

    Foto de Oscar Carrizosa, CC BY-SA 3.0

  • A white, waxy substance on a catus leaf.

    Infección
    Las hembras no voladoras se aparean con machos alados y expulsan diminutas ninfas que segregan una sustancia blanca y cerosa sobre su cuerpo para protegerse del exceso de sol y de la pérdida de agua.

    Foto de Katja Schulz, CC BY 2.0

  • Ácido carmínico
    Las hembras y sus huevos producen una sustancia química roja, el ácido carmínico, para disuadir a los insectos depredadores. Este es el ingrediente clave para producir el codiciado tinte rojo vibrante.

    Foto de gailhampshire, CC BY 2.0

  • Female cochineal and their eggs on a cactus pad.

    Madura para la Cosecha
    Las cochinillas se cosechan de los nopales después de aproximadamente 90 días. Se trata de un proceso muy laborioso en el que los agricultores golpean, cepillan o recogen individualmente a las hembras y sus huevos de los cactus, recolectándolos por miles.

    Foto de Zyance, CC BY-SA 2.5

  • Boiled and sun-dried cochineal.

    Cochinillas Secas
    Las cochinillas se matan hirviéndolas en agua, y luego se secan al sol hasta un 30% de su peso corporal.

    Foto de یردیح ایور , CC BY-SA 3.0

  • Woman grinding dried cochineal into a fine, red powder.

    Moler Hasta Convertir en Polvo
    Los insectos secos se muelen hasta obtener un fino polvo rojo, que se recoge para su posterior procesamiento. Se necesitan unos 70,000 insectos para producir un kilo de tinte.

    Foto de Thelmadatter, CC BY-SA 4.0

  • A glass bottle of carmine.

    La Creación del Tinte
    El carmín, principal ingrediente del tinte rojo, se extrae hirviendo los cuerpos de los insectos pulverizados en agua. Se añaden diferentes productos químicos a la solución, dependiendo del tono de rojo deseado.

    Foto de H. Zell, CC BY-SA 3.0

La cochinilla es uno de los pigmentos más antiguos utilizados en las Américas, se remonta a fechas tan tempranas como el siglo II antes de Cristo. Su color rojo simbolizaba a los dioses, el sol y la sangre, y se empleaba en los rituales de los pueblos maya y azteca, que comercializaban con el en toda América Central y del Sur. Los indígenas de las regiones mexicanas de Puebla, Tlaxcala y Oaxaca disponían de sistemas de cría y de ingeniería de los insectos cochinilla para obtener rasgos ideales para producir pigmentos de pintura roja para colorear manuscritos y murales, y para teñir telas y plumas. Tras la invasión española, se comercializó en todo el mundo, y su producción se convirtió en una industria que dependía totalmente de la experiencia y el trabajo de los indígenas mexicanos, aunque nunca se les reconoció por ello.

La conquista de gran parte del Nuevo Mundo por parte de España en el siglo XVI introdujo los tintes de cochinilla en Europa, lo que disparó rápidamente la demanda mundial. Era más brillante y saturado que cualquier otro tinte rojo del Viejo Mundo, aproximadamente diez veces más potente que la siguiente mejor opción. La explosiva demanda provocó un rápido crecimiento en la producción, que se realizaba casi exclusivamente en Oaxaca por productores indígenas. Se convirtió en el segundo producto de exportación más valorado de México, después de la plata, y para el siglo XVII se comercializaba en lugares tan lejanos como la India. El rojo de la cochinilla se convirtió en un símbolo internacional de poder en Europa y más allá, y su acceso fue controlado exclusivamente por los españoles, quienes mantuvieron el verdadero origen del pigmento como un secreto cuidadosamente guardado hasta el siglo XVIII, cuando los biólogos europeos finalmente descifraron que la fuente era un insecto. Las granjas comenzaron a surgir en otros lugares, lo que puso fin al monopolio mexicano. Para el siglo XIX, la cochinilla fue sustituida en gran medida por tintes sintéticos, aunque todavía se utiliza en muchos alimentos, bebidas, ropa y cosméticos.

A group of historical reenactors in red coats, black top hats holding muskets in their left hand.
Casacas Rojas
Los pigmentos producidos a partir del insecto cochinilla dieron a los "Casacas rojas" ingleses sus uniformes distintivos.

WyrdLight, CC BY-SA 3.0

Faded red and gold clergy robe.

El Clero

El rojo cochinilla se convirtió en un símbolo de autoridad en la Iglesia Católica, que vestía a sus cardenales con túnicas escarlatas como como esta.


VAwebteam, CC BY-SA 3.0

 

  • The Bedroom (1888) by Vincent Van Gogh, France

    Dormitorio en Arlés de Vincent Van Gogh, Francia

    © Museo Van Gogh, Ámsterdam (Fundación Vincent van Gogh)


  • Los Músicos (1595) de Caravaggio, Italia

    Yair Haklai, CC BY-SA 3.0

     

  • Painting of a devil tempting a woman, Saint Rose.

    Santa Rosa de Lima es Atacada por el Demonio (1695-1697) de Cristóbal de Villalpando, España

     

  • The Incredulity of Saint Thomas (1601–1602) by Caravaggio, Italy
    La Incredulidad de Santo Tomás (1601–1602)  de Caravaggio, Italia

  • A woman smiling with arms crossed holding a bag.
    Retrato de Isabella Brant (1625–1626) de Peter Paul Rubens, Italia

     

  • San Jerónimo (1610) de El Greco, España

     

  • Portrait of Agostino Pallavicini (1621) by Anthony van Dyck, Netherlands
    Retrato de Agostino Pallavicini (1621) de Anthony van Dyck, Países Bajos