Past Events

  • 2017 Mar 21

    Fabricating the Authentic: Presenting Anthropology at the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street
    6:00pm

    Image of speaker Lee D. Baker for lecture Fabricating the Authentic: Presenting Anthropology at the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition

    Free Public Lecture

    Lee D. Baker, Dean of Academic Affairs for Trinity College of Arts and Sciences, Associate Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education; Mrs. A. Hehmeyer Professor of Cultural Anthropology, Duke University

    Frederic Ward Putnam, one of the Peabody Museum’s earliest directors, played a key role in establishing anthropology as a scholarly field.

  • 2017 Mar 20

    Celebrate Nowruz!

    Location: 

    Harvard Semitic Museum, 6 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge, MA
    5:30pm to 7:00pm

    Free Special Celebration

    Please join us as we mark the Persian New Year and the beginning of spring at our annual Nowruz celebration!

  • 2017 Mar 15

    Tiny Cells, Global Impact: A Journey of Discovery with a Microbe from the Sea

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street
    6:00pm

    Image of speaker Sallie Chisholm for her lecture Tiny Cells, Global Impact: A Journey of Discovery with a Microbe from the Sea

    Free Public Lecture

    Sallie W. Chisholm, Institute Professor, Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    Phytoplankton–microscopic photosynthetic cells–form the base of ocean food webs. They are responsible for half the photosynthesis on Earth and thus play a central role in our planet’s metabolism.

  • 2017 Mar 07

    Marx, Freud, and the Gods Black People Make: European Social Theory and the Real-Life “Fetish”

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street
    6:00pm

    Image Credit Duke University: J. Lorand Matory, speaker for Marx, Freud, and the Gods Black People Make: European Social Theory and the Real-Life “Fetish”

    Free Public Lecture

    J. Lorand Matory, Lawrence Richardson Professor of Cultural Anthropology and Director, Sacred Arts of the Black Atlantic Project, Duke University

    Since the early-modern encounter between African and European merchants on the Guinea Coast, the term “fetish” has invoked African gods as a metaphor for what European social critics believe to be disorders in European thought.

  • 2017 Mar 06

    Biology of Consciousness: William James to Richard Schultes and Beyond

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street
    6:00pm

    Image: Biology of Consciousness: William James to Richard Schultes and Beyond lecture, speakers Davíd Carrasco and Brian D. Farrell

    Free Public Lecture

    Brian D. Farrell, Director, David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies; Professor of Biology, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University

    Davíd Carrasco, Neil L. Rudenstine Professor of the Study of Latin America, Harvard Divinity School and the Department of Anthropology, Harvard University

    How do biological and cultural forces shape the development of consciousness?

  • 2017 Mar 02

    Tiny Conspiracies: Cell-to-Cell Communication in Bacteria

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street
    6:00pm

    Image: Bonnie L. Bassler, speaker for Tiny Conspiracies: Cell-to-Cell Communication in Bacteria

    Free Public Lecture

    Bonnie L. Bassler, Professor and Chair of Molecular Biology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute; Investigator and Squibb Professor in Molecular Biology, Princeton University

    Harmful bacteria have the capacity to kill humans, animals, and plants, while beneficial bacteria play a vital role in keeping them alive.

  • 2017 Feb 23

    Sacred Nation: Chinese Museums and the Legacy of Empire

    Location: 

    Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street
    6:00pm

    Image: Magnus Fiskesjö, presenter at the Sacred Nation: Chinese Museums and the Legacy of Empire

    Free Public Lecture

    Magnus Fiskesjö, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Cornell University

    The official Chinese view of China’s history and national identity has been transformed in recent decades from a tale of revolutionary class struggle into a story of ancient and unbroken national and imperial glory.

  • 2017 Feb 22

    Panel Discussion on Next of Kin: Seeing Distinction through the Artist's Lens

    Location: 

    Harvard Museum of Natural History, Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street
    6:00pm

    Sable from the Next of Kin exhibit at the Harvard Museum of Natural History

    Panel Discussion

    Carrie Lambert-Beatty, Professor of Visual and Environmental Studies and History of Art and Architecture; Director of Graduate Studies, Film and Visual Studies, Harvard University

    Christina Seely, Artist and Assistant Professor of Studio Art, Dartmouth College

    Ross Virginia, Myers Family Professor of Environmental Science; Director, Institute of Arctic Studies, The John Sloan Dickey Center for International Understanding, Dartmouth College

    Moderated by Edward Morris, Artist; Professor of Practice, Department of Transmedia; Co-Director of The Canary Lab, Syracuse University; Co-Director of The Canary Project

    How do we understand complex ecological issues such as climate change and species extinction?

  • 2017 Feb 11

    I ♥ Science

    Location: 

    Harvard Museum of Natural History, 26 Oxford Street
    10:00am to 4:00pm

    I <3 Science Festival on February 11 from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm

    Explore the marvelous science of our natural world in this annual daylong festival featuring dozens of activities. Dig into the soil to see what’s there, watch live marine creatures, design a LEGO® brick home for an insect, investigate fossils, explore the Glass Flowers, and more!

  • 2017 Jan 20

    Special Glass Flowers Gallery Talk

    Location: 

    Harvard Museum of Natural History, 26 Oxford Street
    2:00pm to 2:30pm

    Glass Flowers Exhibit at the Harvard Museum of Natural History

    Special Gallery Talk

    Tour the Glass Flowers exhibition following its extensive and historic renovation. One of the Harvard’s most famous treasures is the internationally acclaimed Ware Collection of Blaschka Glass Models of Plants, the “Glass Flowers.”

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